Archives for posts with tag: Equifax breach

The Better Business Bureau (BBB) is warning consumers to be aware of scammers trying to make things even worse for victims of the Equifax data breach (www.bbb.org; “Scam Alert: Con Artists Bank on Equifax Breach”).

How does the scam work? BBB warns consumers that scammers are sending out robo calls with a message that the call’s from Equifax which needs to verify the consumer’s account information. Asked to stay on the line, the call’s then connected to a “representative” who will try to get the consumer to reveal her personal financial information.

Don’t do it! Hang up the call ASAP! Yes, consumers getting these scam calls could be among the 143 million people whose information was hacked. But, per BBB, Equifax won’t (we hope) be calling consumers to confirm account information.

In addition to hanging up, BBB alerts consumers not to trust “caller ID”. Scammers know how to “spoof” phone numbers so their calls appear to be from a legitimate company or government organization.

Be alert for these phishing phone calls. Unfortunately, more scams are likely to keep emerging as scammers create more ways to use the massive Equifax breach for their criminal ends.

 

 

 

 

 

Equifax announced yesterday a breach of historic proportions — up to 143 million consumers whose most sensitive data has been breached. This includes SSNs, dates of birth, addresses and whatever other data Equifax — a credit reporting agency — has on millions and millions of individuals.

Everyone needs to go ASAP to the website they’ve created to see if they are among the millions whose information has been hacked. That website is: http://www.equifaxsecurity2017.com. The first step on that site is the “Check Potential Impact” tab where you enter your last name and the last 6 digits of your SSN. Doing so brings up a message of either “no impact” or “thanks” with a date on which to enroll in TrustedIDPremier — meaning that you’re among the millions whose information has been hacked.

The public will likely never know how this happened. Consumers have to be pro-active — go to the Equifax site; go to the Federal Trade Commission website (www.FTC.gov/idtheft) to learn about additional protective steps to take; and of course, keep a very close eye on credit card statements and bank accounts.