There is an effort underway by the Federal Government to create stronger and more trusted online identities for individuals.  The effort was outlined in the National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace (NSTIC).  While many federal agencies are working to implement NSTIC, the lead resides in the Commerce Department; they have created, at NIST, the NSTIC National Program Management Office (NPMO).

The NSTIC NPMO awarded grants a year ago for five pilots to help implement NSTIC.  They just announced (September 17th) a second group of pilot grants.  One of these grants is to ID.me, a company founded by former Army Rangers who had served in Iraq.

ID.me is an online service that helps merchants in securely identifying members of the armed forces so discounts can be offered to them.  Eric Chabrow wrote about the five NSTIC pilots recently (www.govinfosecurity.com; “Pilot Projects Aim to Replace Passwords”).  In his article, Mr. Chabrow explained that the ID.me company will use the pilot grant to grow the current service into a trusted identity solution for a wider group.  The goal is to create a solution what will allow military families to securely access their sensitive information from government agencies, financial institutions and healthcare providers.

This is an excellent goal and one that would well serve our armed forces and their families.  Mr. Chabrow’s article also describes the four other new NSTIC pilot grantees.  Each of the other grantees will also be working to create solutions for stronger and safer online transactions and interactions for adults and children.